The Launch Of AS9100 Rev C Will Make Companies Competitive More

The International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) released a revision to AS9100, the product quality management system (QMS) for the aviation, space and defense industries. But, unlike the recent release of ISO 9001:2008 (which was more of an amended version), Revision C will have more impact significantly. The International Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG) released a revision to AS9100, the quality management system (QMS) for the aviation, space and defense industries.

But, unlike the recent release of ISO 9001:2008 (which was more of an amended version), Revision C will have somewhat more impact. Its benefits, however, outweigh the impact of execution significantly. The new requirements are designed to make significant improvements in reductions and quality in cost—throughout the value stream. The Standards payload includes several new clauses and requirements that concentrate on planning, project management, and risk management.

Its trajectory will also traverse on-time delivery performance, the formal monitoring of client satisfaction tendencies, and formal programs to ensure continual improvement—all are mission critical. IAQGs mission is to raise the on-time, on-quality delivery (OTOQD) performance across all three business industries. To do business in aerospace today, you need to adhere to AS9100, the international standard for aerospace quality.

AS9100 now includes certain requirements of the ISO 9001:2008 Standard, plus additional requirements enforced by the aerospace, aviation and defense industries. AS9100 places additional emphasis on structured design and validation methodologies, configuration management, and traceability and identification. IAQG is the lead organization accountable for revisions. The first draft of the AS9100 revision was developed in July 2007, after considerable inputs from stakeholders.

A coordination draft was delivered to all stakeholders in November 2007. The IAQG 9100 Team met in April 2008 to handle all remarks. The IAQG 9100 team consists of eighteen members representing Americas, Europe, and Asia-Pacific IAQG Sectors. Among the various stakeholders are: Civil aviation authorities, defense and space industry and specialists, certification/registration bodies, trade organizations and IAQG member companies.

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Transition details remain being finalized. We expect that both revisions will stay current for over 2½ years. IAQG has proposed a maximum thirty month implementation schedule from date of publication. Unfortunately, it is not that simple quite. The nice reason is basically because AS9101D, the Quality Management Systems Assessment Standard, has not been approved yet. This Assessment Standard happens to be being revised to be able to simplify it, and to make it easier to facilitate a value-added, process-based audit.

Changes are expected to be rather significant. And it isnt until this sister Standard is approved, that the approximate six-month development period (for sanctioned courseware to teach third-party auditors on the modified standards) may also begin. If the AS9101 Standard is released in the next several months (Q1 or Q2)—and if it takes about six-months to develop sanctioned training materials—it probably will be Q4-2009 or Q1-2010 before any qualification body can audit to the AS9100C Standard. So, third-party auditors cant do anything until the AS9101 Standard is launched also, and the sanctioned training materials are released to the certification bodies.

Once the Assessment Standard has been released, the primary thrust of the first six months shall be to develop auditor training materials. The challenge for the next twelve months will be to train the qualification auditors and bodies. This shows that the earliest chance for organizations to be registered to the new Standard (early adopters) will be about six months from publication of AS9101D. Through the next twelve months, all organizations which have not chosen early adoption will need to update to the new Standard at their next surveillance audit or recertification.

So, it appears that the utmost allowed time to up grade will be thirty months from publication of AS9101D, and any certifications that are to AS9100B will no longer be valid still. Detailed transitioning requirements will be available at or about the time AS9101 is officially released. Revision C changes include expansion of the scope to include “Aviation, Space and Defense,” changes to the look specification, greater concentrate on planning and project management, and additional focus on risk mitigation and management. Keep in mind that ISO 9001:2008 changes have also been incorporated. Additionally, two new conditions were introduced—special requirements, and critical items.